SELF-TRANSCENDENCE AS A DEFINING TRAIT OF HUMAN NATURE: REFLECTIONS ON IMAGO DEI IN GENESIS 1-11

  • Laurențiu Gabriel Nistor, D. Miss (c) Adventus University, Cernica
Keywords: Creation, Human nature, Imago Dei, self-transcendence, human vocation, reductive anthropology, Lonergan, sublation, ethics, human rights

Abstract

The increasingly diverse academic conversation about human nature seems to favour reductive theories of human nature, while relegating integrative or anti-reductionist perspectives from humanities, especially from theology and philosophy to  the periphery. In attempting to offer an anti-reductive response, I re-approach the main Judeo-Christian theory of human nature, through the lens of Bernard Lonergan’s concepts of human nature’s self-transcendence and that of the cognitive  process of sublation through which humans operate inand- through multiple and increasingly complex levels of reality. It is through these lonerganian concepts that I approach the Imago Dei view selectively from the Genesis 1-11 narrative,  attempting to highlight why and how humannature self-understanding should not only be viewed in anti-reductive terms, but positively transcendental.

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Published
2022-06-17
How to Cite
Nistor, D. Miss (c), L. G. (2022). SELF-TRANSCENDENCE AS A DEFINING TRAIT OF HUMAN NATURE: REFLECTIONS ON IMAGO DEI IN GENESIS 1-11. Journal for Freedom of Conscience (Jurnalul Libertății De Conștiință), 9(3), 645-663. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6574296